Choosing wine for Thanksgiving feast

Dear Wine Ladies,

It’s our turn to host this year’s family Thanksgiving dinner with over twenty or so guests expected, each bringing a dish of some shape or form, or taste!
We’re in charge of wine selection and are wondering: What pairs well with turkey?

Dear Wine Ladies,

It’s our turn to host this year’s family Thanksgiving dinner with over twenty or so guests expected, each bringing a dish of some shape or form, or taste!
We’re in charge of wine selection and are wondering: What pairs well with turkey?

We’d like to serve both a red and a white but are really at a loss on where to start! Any recommendations would be most appreciated.

Tom

Calgary, Alberta

Dear Tom,

Choosing a wine to serve at Thanksgiving dinner can be a daunting task, particularly if you’re trying to zero in on the perfect white and red.

We’d actually like to suggest that this is the perfect occasion to go with a little variety and take a little of a relaxed approach.

As we all know, the typical Thanksgiving dinner is not just about the bird; it’s usually accompanied by a cornucopia of dishes including the gravy, the stuffing, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce and Brussels sprouts just to name a few.

With all these flavours and textures, not to mention the varied tastes of all your guests, a small selection of versatile wines would be a great way to go.

We love the idea of welcoming everyone with a sparkling wine. It’s definitely festive and seems to get everyone in a wonderful mood right off the bat; in fact the beauty of sparkling wines is that they could actually carry you right through the meal.

Roses have also become extremely popular with the drier ones pairing well with almost any dish, being light, crisp and not overpowering.

When it comes to red wine choices, Pinot Noir is a natural, usually lighter in body with good fruit and softer tannins or, for a fuller flavour, and fuller bodied wine, Shiraz is still a hot wine capturing the hearts and taste buds of many.

To the white wines; definitely to be considered, the under appreciated Riesling, either dry or with a hint of sweetness, or perhaps a Sauvignon Blanc with it’s bright acidity and herbaceous character marrying well with spices of stuffing and side dishes. If you would like to match “like with like”, a food and wine pairing style, be sure to offer a big, buttery Chardonnay to complement the richness of cream sauces or dressings that will most surely make their way onto the table in one recipe or another.

Happy thanksgiving to all!

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