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Raphael Pommier of Domaine Ogier

In the pink with Raphael Pommier, Brand Ambassador and Associate Winemaker for Domaine Ogier.

On this week’s audio podcast… 

Celebrating International Rosé Day #RoséAllDay June 22nd, 2018

Join the Rosé revolution!

Episode 70

Coming up on the show today, we celebrate International Rosé Day! Yes, as of a couple of years ago Rosé was awarded  its very own day.  In fact now there are three 3 International Rosé Days!!! It seems wine lovers around the world are increasingly seeing the world through rosé-tinted glasses. They are embracing #RoséAllDay with consumption skyrocketing in popularity.  

Gone are the days of super sweet and sappy roses. Now when you think pink, think crisp, dry with a zippy acidity, well made, with a range of seductive aromas. Including the likes of red berries,  peach, citrus, violet, melon, hibiscus and more depending on where it’s made.

Shopping at the local market for ingredients. Planning summer style BBQ for International Rose Day!

Shopping at the local market for ingredients. Planning summer style BBQ for International Rose Day!

For our second perspective on rosés made in France we turn our attention to the Rhone Valley. Our focus is more specifically the appellation of Ventoux. The Ventoux vineyards actually developed and expanded during the Avignon papacy. This papacy was 1309 -1376. The kings of France drank these wines over the centuries.

Our producer Ogier founded in 1859 is situated in the southern Rhone in the famous Chateauneuf-du-Pape. This literally translates to “new castle of the Pope”. Ventoux is enjoying a positive affect of climate change now due to the warmer climes. They are producing wines of deeper colour and body.

Ogier’s Ventoux rosé comes from the best vineyards.

The vineyards are part of the appellation in the South East of the Mont Ventoux mountains. In a recent interview with Associate Winemaker and Brand Ambassador Raphael Pommier we learned that the beautiful acidity his Ventoux wines enjoy along with the full body is due to the positioning of the vineyards. Raphael’s desired culinary partner to enjoy with his Ventoux are grilled veggies doused with olive oil, zucchini, tomatoes and lamb. All prepared with a healthy rub of fresh Provencal herbs was among his top picks, and ours!

Raphael Pommier of Domaine Ogier

Raphael Pommier of Domaine Ogier

Joining us will be Raphael Pommier, Brand Ambassador and Associate Winemaker for Domaine Ogier. Founded in 1859 located in Chateauneuf du Pape, Raphael will share the story of Ogier and fill us in on his Ventoux rose from the Appellation Ventoux Controlee.

Listen to Raphael Pommier at 20:35 minutes in the show.

Maison Ogier Ventoux

Maison Ogier Ventoux

Ventoux Appellation Ventoux Controllé 2017 Ogier    $13.95

Fresh and crisp, this rosé is full bodied, with aromas of fresh berries, hints of pink grapefruit and slight nuances of violet, dry on the palate with red berry flavours and smooth finish.

Made with a blend of Grenache, Syrah and Cinsault

Audio Podcast 06222018 RoseDay2018AD

Coming up on the next The Wine Ladies Audio Podcast. International Rosé Day #RoséAllDay. June 22nd, 2018

Ask The Wine Ladies

Ask The Wine Ladies. Is there such a wine as a white Chateauneuf-du-Pape?

Chateauneuf-du-Pape

Chateauneuf-du-Pape

Dear The Wine Ladies,

A small group of us get together every couple of months for food and drink. Wine is increasingly becoming an important part of our socials. Last month we had a delicious red wine called Chateauneuf du Pape. Is it true that unique to this wine is that it has to be made with thirteen different kinds of grapes? Basically a Cab or Shiraz kind of guy I was just wondering if I heard this right and also if there might be a white Chateauneuf-du-Pape as well subject to the same regulation?

Stan, New York, New York

Ask The Wine Ladies

Ask The Wine Ladies- Please submit your questions to info@thewineladies.com

Dear Stan,

Delicious indeed, the wines of Chateauneuf-du-Pape definitely rank among some of our faves. Actually Stan, it is not obligatory to use all thirteen grape varieties when producing a Chateauneuf-du-Pape. Vintners have the option to use any of, and/or up to all thirteen specific varietals.  Regulations were actually adjusted and up to eighteen varietals in the last few years. 

How and when did the original regulations come about?

In 1923 the Baron Le Roy of Chateau Fortia, a vigneron of that time in Chateauneuf-du-Pape got together with the other growers and drew up a set of rules for the production of wines coming from this region. 

Baron Le Roy Chateau Fortia

Actually the entire appellation system (Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée) in France as we know it today, was fashioned after this very set of regulations. Rules included dictating a minimum alcohol content. The first time in France, 12.5% the highest in France. Defining an area as permitted to be included in Chateauneuf-du-Pape. The Baron also included in the rules ten permissible grape varieties. In 1936 three additional grape varieties were added to the list bringing the total to thirteen. The most prominently used grape variety continues to be Grenache, with Mourvedre and Syrah (Shiraz as many know it) ranked second and third.

There is a white Chateauneuf-du-Pape produced, made of up to six white grape varieties.  It is made only in very small quantities and not regularly available for purchase. 

 Chateauneuf-du-Pape, which translates to “new castle of the Pope”, is an historic village (as well as name of the appellation) between towns Avignon and Orange located in France’s southern Rhone.  It is the best-known wine of the region and typically produces full bodied, powerful, juicy and complex red wines considered among the best of the Rhone Valley. The name dates back to the early 14th century when Avignon was chosen as the new home for the Pope’s court.

The Wine Ladies, Georgia and Susanne 

Chateau Fortia

How many grapes make up a Chateauneuf-du-Pape? Ask The Wine Ladies.

Chateauneuf-du-Pape

Chateauneuf-du-Pape

Dear Wine Ladies,

A small group of us get together every couple of months and more and more. Wine is becoming an important part of our socials. Last month we had a super red called Chateauneuf-du-Pape.  I heard has to be made of thirteen different kinds of grapes. Is this right? I was also wondering if a white of this wine exists?

Oh, and I have to tell you, I totally enjoy tuning into your audio podcasts. I love all your amazing guests!

Lena

Ask The Wine Ladies

Ask The Wine Ladies- Please submit your questions to info@thewineladies.com

Dear Lena,

No, it is not obligatory to use all thirteen grape varieties when producing a Chateauneuf-du-Pape. However, up to thirteen varieties are permitted. In 1923 the Baron Le Roy of Chateau Fortia, a vigneron of that time in Chateauneuf-du-Pape got together with the other growers and drew up a set of rules for the production of these wines.

Baron Pierre Le Roy de Boiseaumarié of Château Fortia

Baron Pierre Le Roy de Boiseaumarié of Château Fortia

Actually the entire appellation system (appellation d’origine controlee) in France as we know it today, was fashioned after this very set of regulations. Apart from dictating minimum alcohol content (12.5%, the highest in France) and defining an area as permitted to be included in Chateauneuf-du-Pape, the Baron also included in the rules ten permissible grape varieties. In 1936 three additional grape varieties were added to the list bringing the total to thirteen. The most prominent grape variety is grenache, with mourvedre and syrah (Shiraz as many know it) in second and third place.

Ask The Wine Ladies. Is there such a wine as a white Chateauneuf-du-Pape?